The Great Class War 1914-1918

Historian Jacques Pauwels applies a critical, revisionist lens to the First World War, offering readers a fresh interpretation that challenges mainstream thinking. As Pauwels sees it, war offered benefits to everyone, across class and national borders.

Jacques R. Pauwels

JACQUES R. PAUWELS has taught European history at the University of Toronto, York University and the University of Waterloo. He is the author of several books on twentieth-century history, including The Myth of the Good War, in which he provides a revisionist look at the role of the United States and other Allied countries in the Second World War. An independent scholar, Pauwels holds PhDs in history and political science. He lives in Brantford, Ontario.

Chapter Title Abstract Contributors Pages Year Price

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Introduction to the concept of Dali-vision and how you have to remove yourself to examine the situation. Brief overview of how the author will tackle the Great War from a class percpective by … 14 $1.40

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The French Revolution of 1789, in which the bourgeoisie, the peasants and the workers challenge the king, the nobility, and the church, sets in motion the march toward democracy, the emancipation … 14 $1.40

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After its traumatic experiences of 1848 and 1871 — respectively “the crazy year” and the annus horribilis of the Paris Commune — the bourgeoisie ceases to be revolutionary … 20 $2.00

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The elite tries to exorcize the proletarian threat not only by using the “stick” of bloody repression but also the “carrot” of social legislation and political reforms. … 12 $1.20

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As antidote against socialist internationalism, the elite stimulates nationalism. “Social imperialism” à la Cecil Rhodes simultaneously serves as a safety valve that reduces … 18 $1.80

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The process of democratization seems to be irresistible and, with the rise of the “masses,” the elite, besieged and increasingly pessimistic, seeks remedies in Social- Darwinist … 22 $2.20

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The imperialist rivalries heat up as a result of the rapidly increasing importance of new raw materials such as rubber and oil. War becomes more and more likely and ultimately inevitable. The … 21 $2.10

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Of an apparently unavoidable Great War, the industrial bourgeoisie expects considerable economic advantages. But the other pillars of the elite, the nobility and the church, also entertain high … 14 $1.40

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Early 1900s. The elite is convinced that the revolutionary danger is increasing rapidly, and also feels threatened by the revolutionary plans of ethnic minorities, by the designs of feminists, … 13 $1.30

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Early 1900s. The tension becomes unbearable, and the elite becomes more and more convinced that only war is the definitive solution of the social problem — and of many other problems. There … 24 $2.40

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1914. The assassination in Sarajevo — basically a rather unimportant event — does not constitute a genuine casus belli. But it provides the elite with the pretext it needs to unleash … 18 $1.80

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1914. Why do the plebeians go to war so meekly? Because they have been indoctrinated to do so in an extremely effective fashion by the school and the church, or compelled by compulsory military … 20 $2.00

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1914. When war breaks out, the elite is delighted, and understandably so: strikes and other social troubles suddenly come to an end, the revolutionary threat goes up in smoke, and the political … 24 $2.40

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1914 The armies of all belligerent countries have a very pronounced “class character.” The simple soldiers are almost exclusively plebeians, mostly peasants. The officers belong to … 11 $1.10

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During the fall of 1914 the enthusiasm of August, which had not been as great as generally believed, gradually evaporates in all countries, to be replaced by disappointment, despondency, and … 25 $2.50

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In all the armies there exists a strict apartheid between the officers, representatives of the upper class, and their subordinates, almost exclusively proletarians and other members of the lower … 29 $2.90

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August 1914: All armies go to war brimming with confidence. The commanders proceed to implement the plans that are supposed to guarantee success, such as Plan XVII of the French and the famous … 14 $1.40

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Except in its opening and closing stages, the Great War is a “stationary war,” to be associated forever with concepts such as trenches, no man’s land, and barbed wire — … 33 $3.30

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In 1915, the French and British launch a number of large-scale offensives on the western front, hoping to pierce the German lines and thus to win the war. But in trench warfare the defenders, … 12 $1.20

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In 1915, countless allied lives, mainly Australian and New Zealander, are wasted in a vain attempt to advance toward Istanbul via the Gallipoli Peninsula and thus to knock the Ottoman Empire out … 18 $1.80

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Fall 1915. The soldiers of all the armies are tired of the war. They dream of being able to go home, even if this means that their country will not win. They hate the politicians, their military … 23 $2.30

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If men armed with rifles and bayonets cannot open a gap in defensive lines, perhaps it can be done by simply obliterating the enemy in his trenches by means of massive shelling by the artillery. … 16 $1.60

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In the course of the year 1916 it becomes increasingly evident that soldiers as well as civilians are disgruntled and restless. The workers and other plebeians are experiencing great difficulties … 24 $78.48

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The particularly turbulent year 1917 brings the Allies a lot of bad news. In an offensive on the Chemin des Dames, the French suffer enormous losses. The Third Battle of Ypres concludes with a … 11 $1.10

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The soldiers of all belligerent countries become rebellious and mutinies break out. On the home front, the restlessness and discontent of undernourished civilians is reflected in countless … 26 $2.60

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In 1917, the US government decides, against the will of the great majority of the population, to take the country into the war on the side of the Entente and against Germany. It does not do so on … 18 $1.80

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In Russia, in early 1917, war weariness and discontent, and hostility toward the czarist regime, reach unprecedented heights. In March, crowds demonstrate in front of the Winter Palace in … 18 $1.80

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On March 3, 1918, Germany and Russia sign a peace treaty in Brest-Litovsk. Shortly afterward, on the first day of spring, March 21, the western front witnesses the start of a huge German … 17 $1.70

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The war that was supposed to be an antidote to revolution actually produces the revolution. The revolution is smothered in blood in Germany and Hungary, but succeeds in Russia in spite of … 27 $2.70

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On June 28, 1919, exactly five years after the assassination in Sarajevo, the signing of the Peace Treaty of Versailles officially terminates the Great War. In reality, this treaty merely … 6 $0.60

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The European elite, henceforth dominated by the industrial and financial bourgeoisie, is frustrated by the counterproductive outcome of the Great War. After 1918 it seeks again to exorcise the … 27 $2.70

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Like the Great War, the Second War produces a most unsatisfactory outcome for the elite of the “Western” World, namely a triumph of the Soviet homeland of revolution and the resulting … 25 $2.50