Author(s)

;

Publication Year

Publisher

ISBN: 9781552212073-09

Categories: ,

Understanding the Principled Arguments for

Criminalizing Misbehaviour by Youths under

Twelve

From: Children and the Law

$1.20

Review of a recommendation to lower the minimum age of criminal responsibility in certain circumstances from twelve to ten.

View

Contributors

Anthony N. Doob

Anthony N. Doob is a professor of Criminology at the Centre of Criminology, University of Toronto and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. He has been at the University of Toronto since 1968, first in the Department of Psychology and later at the Centre of Criminology. He graduated from Harvard in 1964 and received his PhD (in psychology) from Stanford University in 1967. He served as director of the Centre of Criminology from 1979 to 1989 and was one of the members of the Canadian Sentencing Commission from 1984 until 1987. He has written on a wide range of topics related to the youth and adult justice systems and Canadian imprisonment policies including Responding to Youth Crime in Canada (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2004, with Carla Cesaroni); Justice for Girls? Stability and Change in the Youth Justice Systems of the United States and Canada (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009, with Jane Sprott); and “Punitive Trends and Stable Imprisonment Rates in Canada” in Michael Tonry, ed., Crime and Justice: A Review of Research, Vol. 36 (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007, with Cheryl Marie Webster).

Jane B. Sprott

Jane B. Sprott received her PhD from the Centre of Criminology at the University of Toronto. She is currently an associate professor in the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology at Ryerson University. Her research interests include the operation of the youth and adult criminal justice systems, pretrial detention, and perceptions of crime and criminal justice policies. Professor Sprott has published work on a variety of issues related to youth justice including, most recently, Justice for Girls? Stability and Change in the Youth Justice Systems of the United States and Canada (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009, with Anthony N. Doob); “Punishing Processes in Youth Court: Procedural Justice, Court Atmosphere and Youths’ Views of the Legitimacy of the Justice System” (2010) 52:5 Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice, with Greene, Madon, and Jung; and “Gendered Treatment: Bail Conditions Placed on Youths” (2010) 52: 4 Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice, with Anthony N. Doob.