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ISBN: 9781552214541-07

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Did Weber Affect the Timeliness of Arbitration?

From: One Law for All?

$2.80

Presentation of results from a comprehensive statistical study attempting to analyse quantitatively the impacts on efficiency and delay in arbitration of the subjects added to arbitral jurisdiction by the Weber decision.

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Contributors

Kevin Banks

Kevin Banks is an Associate Professor and Director of the Centre for Law in the Contemporary Workplace, Faculty of Law, Queen’s University. He holds an LLB and a degree in Economics from the University of Toronto, and a doctorate from Harvard Law School. Prior to taking up an academic career, Kevin practised labour law (representing unions and individual workers), and served in a number of senior positions in the federal public service. He has published widely on domestic, international and comparative labour law in national and international academic journals and collected papers, advised governments and government task forces, and sat as an arbitrator under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Succeeding his mentor Bernie Adell, he is currently editor-in-chief of the Canadian Labour and Employment Law Journal.

Richard Chaykowski

Richard Chaykowski received his PhD from Cornell University. He is currently Director of the MIR Program at Queen’s University, cross-appointed to Queen’s Faculty of Law. He is a member of the Advisory Board of the Queen’s Centre for Law in the Contemporary Workplace. He has also been a visiting scholar at MIT, University of Toronto and McGill University. His public service includes a stint as Visiting Chair at Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, and as Research Director for the federal Expert Panel on Older Workers. His teaching and research interests include labour policy, the intersection of labour policy and law, labour relations and collective bargaining, North American labour markets, implications of the aging workforce, employee accommodation in the workplace, and workplace innovation and the impacts of technological change in the workplace. He has published over fifty papers in national and international journals, edited volumes and periodicals, as well as other professional and technical reports.

George Slotsve

George Slotsve received his PhD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1989. He has a BA in Economics from Queen’s University (1981) and an MA in Economics from the University of Western Ontario (1982). Dr. Slotsve is currently a faculty member in the Department of Economics at Northern Illinois University. Prior to joining NIU, he held faculty appointments at Vanderbilt University and Dalhousie University, and has been a Visiting Professor at the University of the Philippines (Diliman, Quezon), and a Visiting Scholar and Visiting Professor at Queen’s University.