Academic Freedom in Conflict

For more than a century academics have had unique rights — to speak, teach, and write freely. Central to the case for academic freedom is that scholars must be able to voice their views free of fear in order for society to gain a better understanding of ourselves and our world and to be effective teachers.

Academic freedom has always faced challenges. Professors have been pressed to alter their work because it offends powerful interests — both inside and outside the university. Some have been fired or denied jobs for their political views, their criticisms of colleagues and administrators, and their refusal to buckle under corporate pressures to hush up research findings. The sixteen contributors to this volume cite many such instances in Canada and the U.S. More significantly, they point out how governments, corporations, and university administrators today are seeking to narrow academic freedom. Among them:

Major donors are acquiring control over university teaching and even hiring decisions

University administrators are firing professors with unpopular political views, while pretending that the reasons for their decisions lie elsewhere

Governments are using funding mechanisms to force-feed research in some areas, while shutting down inquiry in others

Campus-wide policies enforcing civility rules are preventing criticism and debate within a university

Judges are issuing decisions which reverse previous rulings supporting academic freedom in the U.S. and Canada

Together the contributors to this book examine attempts to restrict academic freedom and explore its legitimate limits.

James L Turk

The sixteen contributors to this book include many distinguished Canadian and U.S. scholars who have a special interest in academic freedom.

Chapter Title Abstract Contributors Pages Year Price

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Outlines the arguments made in the book and why this book is important to the discussion going on ; 18 $1.80

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Constitutional scholar David Rabban examines the increasing prominence of the concept of “institutional academic freedom” in American constitutional law and its implications. He … 30 $3.00

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Len Findlay looks broadly at the changing character of the contemporary university, and how university autonomy has become a threat to academic freedom rather than a means to ensure it. As … 16 $1.60

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Matthew W. Finkin starts from the position, following the “1915 Declaration,” that “academic freedom is a professional liberty in the exercise of which the faculty member is … 29 $2.90

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Mark Gabbert addresses the same issues, starting from a concern that “a too one-sided emphasis on professional norms risks having the effect of producing not critical minds but . . . well, … 27 $2.70

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Joan Scott discusses the tensions inherent in the theory and practice of the academy as a self-regulating community. She explores those tensions and argues that, while they are unresolvable, they … 27 $2.70

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John Baker offers a philosophical analysis of whether it is plausible to claim that an institution can require compliance with tenets of a religion while being capable of fulfilling the societal … 22 $2.20

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William Bruneau examines religious conviction within universities, tracing the history of religious universities in Canada. He identifies major arguments made by defenders of religious … 32 $3.20

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Gerald Gerbrandt provides a personal perspective on these issues as the President Emeritus of Canadian Mennonite University and formerly as a faculty member at the Mennonite Bible College. … 12 $1.20

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Richard Moon takes up the question of whether there should be more restrictions on freedom of expression in the university in order for it to fulfill its educational mission, noting that the … 26 $2.60

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Anver Saloojee extends issues raised in Scott’s article to look specifically at the tension between academic freedom and freedom from discrimination as universities have become more … 15 $1.50

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David Schneiderman addresses respectful workplace policies that universities and colleges have adopted as the diversification of post-secondary educational institutions has given rise to … 17 $1.70

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Sheldon Krimsky looks at institutional conflicts of interest and how they should be dealt with to allow a full realization of academic freedom. 22 $2.20

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Risa L. Lieberwitz traces some of the history of the tightening university-industry embrace and explores the actual merger of university and corporate interests in the case of the Cornell … 28 $2.80

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I point out examples of the corporate undermining of scientific inquiry, review studies on the extent to which universities have compromised their academic integrity in corporate collaborations, … 16 $1.60

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Jamie Cameron concludes the book with an examination of the implications for academic freedom of the growing movement for civil discourse. She examines American and Canadian university respectful … 25 $2.50